A new Apiary has opened at Witney managed by Keith Crocker.

The OBKA Apiary coordinator is Nick Holt-Kentwell.

View pictures and get more information from http://www.witneybees.com/.

 

 

Located at Marlborough School, Oxfordshire Beekeepers Association's apiary in Woodstock boasts a custom-made, fully equipped workshed. The facility is designed to meet the needs of beginner beekeepers, including study for the BBKA Basic Examination. OBKA works closely with the school to engage students in the world of beekeeping.

 

Note for your Diary:

Saturday (date to be announced), from 11am, April 2016: Spring clear up and hive opening

Saturday (date to be announced), from 11am, August 2016: Autumn clear up and hive opening

 

Bee-Bole

Within the Woodstock apiary stands a Bee-bole, which serves to remind newcomers to beekeeping that it is an ancient craft on which they are embarking. The Bee-bole also highlights the development of bee management techniques (from skeps to the modern hive) as well as pointing out the value of changing comb regularly. 
 

Bee Garden

Adjacent to the teaching apiary at Woodstock is the bee garden, that displays the main species of plants that all types of nectar-seeking insects (including bees) favour. This extension to the apiary is meant to provide not only an educational resource, but also an area where staff, students, members and visitors can relax and enjoy the moment.

 

Comply with health and safety regulations


Are you selling your honey on a small scale?
Are you complying with the Law?
Follow this useful guide from the British Beekeepers Association to allay any doubts.
honeybee castes

About Honey Bees

Bees kept by beekeepers, the Western Honeybee,  is one of about seven kinds worldwide. There are also about 20 species of Bumblebees and at least 250 species of solitary bees in Britain.
The Three Castes: The Honeybee Colony consists of three castes of bee:
 

The Queen, who is mother to all the other bees in the colony.

Workers (female honeybees) numbering about 10,000 in winter rising to some 50,000 or more in summer .

Drones In summer the colony contains from 200 - 1000 drones (male bees), but there are none in the winter.

 

Every foraging bee is also a pollinator, so this means increased yields of fruit, nuts and seed crops, not only to the farmer but to each of you, who love to work in the garden, and to those who walk in our parks and countryside.



Single bee on comb

Products of the Hive

Our honeybees are doing what they have done for millions of years - and their Honey must surely be one of the few foods unchanged by man. Enjoy our bees' honey and be assured that it has been handled with care. Apart from honey, other products of a Colony are Beeswax, Royal Jelly, Pollen, and Propolis. Royal Jelly is produced from certain glands of the worker bee and is fed to the developing larvae. Pollen is collected on two of the worker bee's six legs and carried back to the hive - it is a high protein beefood. Propolis is a plant resin used by the bees to strengthen and waterproof the hive and is known to have valuable antibiotic properties.

Read about selling honey

Bee on yellow flower

Flowers and nectar

The annual cycle of flowers producing nectar and/or pollen, is something like: hazel, soft fruit, top fruits, holly, maple, sycamore, oil seed rape, field bean, marigold, limetrees and later, heather. Of course, the precise source of nectar will depend upon the season and locality.
 

 

hive inspection

Teaching Apiary

The Association has a teaching apiary at the Marlborough School in Woodstock, which boasts a custom-made workshed, fully equipped to meet the needs of beginner beekeepers including study for the BBKA Basic Examination. The Woodstock Teaching Apiary is managed by Kevin Mewis and Jonathan Clark.
 
 

Bee-Bole

Within the Woodstock apiary stands a Bee-bole, which serves to remind newcomers to beekeeping that it is an ancient craft on which they are embarking. The Bee-bole also highlights the development of bee management techniques (from skeps to the modern hive) as well as pointing out the value of changing comb regularly. 
 

Bee Garden

Adjacent to the teaching apiary at Woodstock is the bee garden, that displays the main species of plants that all types of nectar-seeking insects (including bees) favour. This extension to the apiary is meant to provide not only an educational resource, but also an area where staff, students, members and visitors can relax and enjoy the moment.